Freedom Walker

by Sandra Allen Lovelace  @SandraALovelace  #FreedomWalker  #TimetobeYOU

“A true believer must die to self in order to follow Christ.” Have you heard that statement? Were you told or did you somehow come to understand you had to set aside who you are, suppress the core, the essence of your unique design, in order to please Jesus?

Many women have lived, are living, with that very idea and strive to meet the expectation. I was one of them … and I suggest it’s time we challenge that directive. Share on X

The die to self concept is drawn primarily from John 12:24. “Truly, truly. I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone. But if it dies, it bears much fruit.” Christ’s words might support the idea we should eliminate the kernel, or heart of who we are, if we ignore the context.

Christ is in Jerusalem explaining to His disciples what’s about to happen. The grain of wheat refers to Himself … the living bread of John 6:51. Matthew Henry, the biblical scholar, clarifies falls into the earth as Christ’s birth in Bethlehem where His divinity was hidden in human form.**

The comparison is easy to follow that Jesus dies in order to bear much fruit through the salvation of souls by His resurrection to new life. Matthew 13:8, Mark 4:8, and Luke 8:8 carry on the natural world parable that seeds sown in good soil rise to yield a crop many times over.

Surely Christ’s divine essence remained intact throughout His earthly assignment and continues by His reign in the heavenlies. And so should our divinely-created seed, sown in Christ through salvation. Share on X

Rather than deny our self, let’s tend that precious core of who we are that we too might bloom and flourish in our Ephesians 2:10 purpose.

From death to life, from bondage to freedom.
Let me know if I can encourage your heart. SandraAllenLovelace@gmail.com

Whole. Secure. Free.

      Sandra

*references are NASB unless otherwise noted
**Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible, Hendrickson Publishers, Inc. 2008. p. 159

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